Migration notebook

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Reporter's notebook from independent producer-reporter Emma Jacobs, until recently of NPR-affiliate WHYY in Philadelphia. Co-conspirator on Longshot Radio.

In its latest incarnation, this is a deep dive into the immigration side of my reporting beat. Thoughts, tips: ejacobs (at) whyy (dot) org, @ecjacobs.

September 30, 2014 at 11:00am
1 note
May’s Pacific Standard had an interview with the founder of Pancho Villa’s Army, the main U.S. based fan club of the Mexican soccer team. His name is Sergio Tristan.  
In Mexico, the rivalry with the U.S. team is politically charged. There’s a lot of animosity toward the U.S. and some of their political decisions that have affected Mexico. For us in the U.S., it’s a celebration of our culture. It’s a way to express that frustration from when we were younger and were labeled negatively.
Our group will start diminishing. My generation never believed we could play for the U.S. If Mexican American kids really believe they can make the U.S. team, the U.S. will convert a ton of Mexican Americans to U.S. fans. And I’m fine with that
Read the whole Q & A.

May’s Pacific Standard had an interview with the founder of Pancho Villa’s Army, the main U.S. based fan club of the Mexican soccer team. His name is Sergio Tristan

  • In Mexico, the rivalry with the U.S. team is politically charged. There’s a lot of animosity toward the U.S. and some of their political decisions that have affected Mexico. For us in the U.S., it’s a celebration of our culture. It’s a way to express that frustration from when we were younger and were labeled negatively.
  • Our group will start diminishing. My generation never believed we could play for the U.S. If Mexican American kids really believe they can make the U.S. team, the U.S. will convert a ton of Mexican Americans to U.S. fans. And I’m fine with that

Read the whole Q & A.

7:41am
2,697 notes
Reblogged from humansofnewyork
humansofnewyork:

"The saddest moment of my life was when my son left for America. I begged him not to go, but it was no use. He was my son but also my best friend. He used to tell me everything, but all he tells me now is: ‘Don’t worry, I have a job. I’ll tell you everything when I get back.’ I think he just doesn’t want me to worry about him. Because I heard from his friend that he’s being badly mistreated."
(Mexico City, Mexico)

humansofnewyork:

"The saddest moment of my life was when my son left for America. I begged him not to go, but it was no use. He was my son but also my best friend. He used to tell me everything, but all he tells me now is: ‘Don’t worry, I have a job. I’ll tell you everything when I get back.’ I think he just doesn’t want me to worry about him. Because I heard from his friend that he’s being badly mistreated."

(Mexico City, Mexico)

September 29, 2014 at 10:00am
3 notes
Application rates for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals have been relatively low for young immigrants from Asian countries.
Undocumented Asian immigrants shy away from revealing their status, a recent story on PRI’s The World, tries to explain why.


Her mom got work as a nanny. Lin went to school. Then Lin turned old enough to drive and mentioned the prospect of getting a driver’s license to her mom. “She was like, you just can’t do it. And she wouldn’t even tell me why,” Lin says.

A few months later, Lin brought up college. But like many immigrants without the authorization to live in the US, they had had overstayed their tourist visas. "She finally sat me down and said, ‘Look, you’re undocumented,’" Lin remembers.

That’s not an uncommon story for Asian immigrants: Advocates say they often hide their situation from their children. "People just don’t talk about their immigration status or how they came to the US," said Anthony Ng, an immigrant rights activist from the Philippines. He says Asian immigrants often feel shame and embarrassment around not having legal status. 

And that means it’s hard to convince them to get help. 

Application rates for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals have been relatively low for young immigrants from Asian countries.

Undocumented Asian immigrants shy away from revealing their status, a recent story on PRI’s The World, tries to explain why.

Her mom got work as a nanny. Lin went to school. Then Lin turned old enough to drive and mentioned the prospect of getting a driver’s license to her mom. “She was like, you just can’t do it. And she wouldn’t even tell me why,” Lin says.

A few months later, Lin brought up college. But like many immigrants without the authorization to live in the US, they had had overstayed their tourist visas. "She finally sat me down and said, ‘Look, you’re undocumented,’" Lin remembers.

That’s not an uncommon story for Asian immigrants: Advocates say they often hide their situation from their children. "People just don’t talk about their immigration status or how they came to the US," said Anthony Ng, an immigrant rights activist from the Philippines. He says Asian immigrants often feel shame and embarrassment around not having legal status. 

And that means it’s hard to convince them to get help. 

September 25, 2014 at 10:00am
0 notes
The last story I filed for WHYY before taking the leap to independent producer was a basic explainer on Central American unaccompanied minors staying in temporary housing in Pennsylvania. The story ran yesterday.
While they’re no longer the top story on CNN, the federal government is still processing large numbers of Central American children who recently arrived at the U.S. border.
After running out of space to house them, the federal government has been placing small numbers of children in facilities across the country — including in four Pennsylvania shelters.
Read the full story after the jump.

The last story I filed for WHYY before taking the leap to independent producer was a basic explainer on Central American unaccompanied minors staying in temporary housing in Pennsylvania. The story ran yesterday.

While they’re no longer the top story on CNN, the federal government is still processing large numbers of Central American children who recently arrived at the U.S. border.

After running out of space to house them, the federal government has been placing small numbers of children in facilities across the country — including in four Pennsylvania shelters.

Read the full story after the jump.

September 22, 2014 at 12:01pm
2 notes
Public radio has been doing great reporting on the ongoing issue of Central American child and family migration to the US. I had some time to catch up on some listening this weekend and wanted to share a selection:
NPR asked why Central Americans are risking the dangerous trip from Central America. They have a beautifully done and comprehensive overview from Kelly McEvers and a call with reporter Carrie Kahn.  Kahn discusses a range of troubling issues she found in Guatemala, from gang violence but also including domestic violence and rising pregnancy rates among very young children. She says every single one of the children she talked to says they’re going to try to make it to the US again because there’s nothing for them at home.
PRI’s The World also asked why children come. Their report opens with vendors hawking newspapers full of accounts of drug and gang-related violence.
One more description of gang violence in Guatemala from a family currently in San Diego, as heard on Latino USA.
This story, which aired on PRI’s The World in August, tells the story of a young boy from Guatemala who says he was sexually assaulted in a US detention facility after reaching the US. 
Jude Joffe-Block follows child migrants as they transition from shelters to life in Phoenix with parents they hardly know after long separations, and the support their families are offered by a local church. 
She also spoke last week with a 16-year-old named Jose, 24 hours after he was deported back to El Salvador. He tells her he’s in hiding because of his fear of gang violence.

Public radio has been doing great reporting on the ongoing issue of Central American child and family migration to the US. I had some time to catch up on some listening this weekend and wanted to share a selection:

NPR asked why Central Americans are risking the dangerous trip from Central America. They have a beautifully done and comprehensive overview from Kelly McEvers and a call with reporter Carrie Kahn.  Kahn discusses a range of troubling issues she found in Guatemala, from gang violence but also including domestic violence and rising pregnancy rates among very young children. She says every single one of the children she talked to says they’re going to try to make it to the US again because there’s nothing for them at home.

PRI’s The World also asked why children come. Their report opens with vendors hawking newspapers full of accounts of drug and gang-related violence.

One more description of gang violence in Guatemala from a family currently in San Diego, as heard on Latino USA.

This story, which aired on PRI’s The World in Augusttells the story of a young boy from Guatemala who says he was sexually assaulted in a US detention facility after reaching the US. 

Jude Joffe-Block follows child migrants as they transition from shelters to life in Phoenix with parents they hardly know after long separations, and the support their families are offered by a local church. 

She also spoke last week with a 16-year-old named Jose, 24 hours after he was deported back to El Salvador. He tells her he’s in hiding because of his fear of gang violence.

9:00am
0 notes
Unfortunately, it’s been possible over the last several years to trace the progress of violent conflicts in the Middle East in the progressive waves of émigrés seeking to reach Europe.
Some seek entry via the Spanish territories on the North African coast, Ceuta and Melilla but more undertake dangerous sea voyages on what are often flimsy boats operated by human smugglers.
The latest tragedy at sea involved a boat of migrants mostly from Gaza and Egypt, including around 100 young children. Their vessel was deliberately sunk by smugglers and The New York Times reports there are only 11 known survivors.
The UN’s High Commissioner for Human Rights has called this a “mass murder.”
…
This is by no means the first incident of its kind. In an editorial, The Guardian brings up a really sad correlate to all of this. It says the victims of many accidents involving boats of migrants are being buried in unmarked graves when they should be identified and have their families notified.

Unfortunately, it’s been possible over the last several years to trace the progress of violent conflicts in the Middle East in the progressive waves of émigrés seeking to reach Europe.

Some seek entry via the Spanish territories on the North African coast, Ceuta and Melilla but more undertake dangerous sea voyages on what are often flimsy boats operated by human smugglers.

The latest tragedy at sea involved a boat of migrants mostly from Gaza and Egypt, including around 100 young children. Their vessel was deliberately sunk by smugglers and The New York Times reports there are only 11 known survivors.

The UN’s High Commissioner for Human Rights has called this a “mass murder.”

This is by no means the first incident of its kind. In an editorial, The Guardian brings up a really sad correlate to all of this. It says the victims of many accidents involving boats of migrants are being buried in unmarked graves when they should be identified and have their families notified.

September 19, 2014 at 6:32pm
0 notes
via @pdacosta

via @pdacosta

September 18, 2014 at 10:00am
1 note
Wow, this quote from The New York Times:

Angela M. Kelley, vice president for immigration policy at the Center for American Progress, said Latinos — like an aggrieved girlfriend who has waited in vain for a marriage proposal — are going to expect Mr. Obama to take even more expansive executive action later this year, given the delay.
“A guy says he’s going to propose, and then he decides he’s going to delay and not propose for a couple of months, so you go, ‘O.K., I want a two-carat ring now instead of a one-carat ring,’ ” Ms. Kelley said. “The cost is high for what he’s done in terms of a delay. He’s asking the community to pay now, and to some extent, he’ll have to pay later.”
(via Political Shift Stalls Efforts to Overhaul Immigration - NYTimes.com)

Wow, this quote from The New York Times:

Angela M. Kelley, vice president for immigration policy at the Center for American Progress, said Latinos — like an aggrieved girlfriend who has waited in vain for a marriage proposal — are going to expect Mr. Obama to take even more expansive executive action later this year, given the delay.

“A guy says he’s going to propose, and then he decides he’s going to delay and not propose for a couple of months, so you go, ‘O.K., I want a two-carat ring now instead of a one-carat ring,’ ” Ms. Kelley said. “The cost is high for what he’s done in terms of a delay. He’s asking the community to pay now, and to some extent, he’ll have to pay later.”

(via Political Shift Stalls Efforts to Overhaul Immigration - NYTimes.com)

September 16, 2014 at 11:55pm
0 notes

The Colbert Report
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Stephen Colbert consults with future Stephen Colbert of 2372 about whether immigration reform has happened yet.

September 9, 2014 at 10:00am
1 note
Via @globalnation, here’s where migrant families are being detained along the US-Mexico border.

Via @globalnation, here’s where migrant families are being detained along the US-Mexico border.